Paul Revere's House

Over the summer I visited Boston with Dalvero Academy as part of our project following the Charles W. Morgan on her 38th Voyage. One of the places we visited while there was Paul Revere's house at 19 North Square in the North End. Revere owned the home from 1770-1800, where he lived with his second wife Rachel Walker, their 8 children, and his wife's mother (he already had 8 from his previous marriage to Sarah Orne! And the house only had 4 rooms! Can you say nightmare?)

Facade of the Paul Revere House in Boston's North End. © Carly Larsson 2014.

Facade of the Paul Revere House in Boston's North End. © Carly Larsson 2014.

The windows were made with manganese oxide which changes color in the sunlight. People in the 1800s saw this as a defect but I thought it was beautiful! © Carly Larsson 2014

The windows were made with manganese oxide which changes color in the sunlight. People in the 1800s saw this as a defect but I thought it was beautiful! © Carly Larsson 2014

While most of us know Paul Revere for his activity in the Revolutionary War, he was a gold and silversmith, a trade he learned from his father. He also worked as a copperplate engraver during the pre-Revolution depression, and moonlighted as a dentist from 1768-1775, cleaning teeth and wiring false teeth made from walrus ivory or other animal bones. After the Revolutionary War, Revere opened a foundry and supplied bolts, spikes and nails for North End shipyards (including brass fittings for the U.S.S. Constitution), produced cannons, cast bells, and opened the first copper-rolling mill in North America in 1801 where he provided copper sheeting for the hull of the U.S.S. Constitution and the dome of the Massachusetts State House. I was surprised by how much Paul Revere accomplished in his lifetime, how many different things he did, and how little I knew about much of it!      

900 lb bronze bell cast in 1804 by the Paul Revere & Son foundry. On display in the courtyard of the Paul Revere House in Boston's North End. © Carly Larsson 2014

900 lb bronze bell cast in 1804 by the Paul Revere & Son foundry. On display in the courtyard of the Paul Revere House in Boston's North End. © Carly Larsson 2014

One if by Land, Two if by Sea

I recently spent a week in Boston with Dalvero Academy, and one of the locations we visited was the Old North Church. The church was founded in 1722, making it Boston's oldest surviving church building. It is most known for its role in the beginning of the American Revolution. On the evening of April 18 1775, Robert Newman and Capt. John Pulling Jr. climbed the steeple and held up two lanterns as a signal from Paul Revere to warn patriots in Charlestown that the British were arriving by sea across the Charles River and would soon be marching to Lexington and Concord. Here are a couple drawings I made of the steeple!