Berkshires Weekend Pt. 2

On Sunday we ordered room service and sprawled out in bed with our breakfast and the NY Times.  Then I started the day with a selfie in my plushy Red Lion Inn bathrobe. 

Sunday morning selfie © Carly Larsson 2015

Sunday morning selfie © Carly Larsson 2015

I was determined to draw some farm animals, so we checked out of the inn and set off for another adventurous day of driving aimlessly down winding back roads. 

Sheep! © Carly Larsson 2015

Sheep! © Carly Larsson 2015

We happened upon these sheep grazing on a hill & pulled over so I could make a quick drawing. Even though the area was pretty desolate, the people in the nearby house did not seem to appreciate us parking out front, so I hurried to capture the fluffy little dudes and we were soon on our way. Coming from NYC where people  live in such close quarters, I have to laugh at how protective country folk can be of their sprawling properties.

Horses huddling for warmth © Carly Larsson 2015

Horses huddling for warmth © Carly Larsson 2015

Next, we found these horses huddled together for warmth in a picturesque field lined with trees and some blue mountains off in the distance. They were all standing together in a clump (probably for warmth) which made them hard to draw or photograph, so, hungry and cold, we headed back to Lee, MA for brunch at our new favorite cafe - appropriately named the Starving Artist Creperie.

 © Carly Larsson 2015

 © Carly Larsson 2015

 Enjoying live music at the Starving Artist Creperie © Carly Larsson 2015

 Enjoying live music at the Starving Artist Creperie © Carly Larsson 2015

We were pleased to discover that there was a musician playing during Sunday brunch. This little kid in his pom-pom monkey hat and his baby sister (in a matching hat) seemed pretty excited about it themselves. 

Guy with commendable mustache getting some work done © Carly Larsson 2015

Guy with commendable mustache getting some work done © Carly Larsson 2015

Grey reading the NY Times on his phone while I take too long to finish my lunch because of drawing everyone © Carly Larsson 2015

Grey reading the NY Times on his phone while I take too long to finish my lunch because of drawing everyone © Carly Larsson 2015

Then it was back to the road, because we needed to find some more lively animals! Luckily, it didn't take too long to stumble upon a dairy farm. The cows were so cute and curious! 

2015.11.29 Cows 1.jpg

I got a little nervous, as one by one they approached the gate and started poking their heads out like they were trying to make a break for it.  They made quite the ruckus, mooing and ramming themselves into the gate. Fearing an angry farmer would soon make an appearance, we set out in search of some more animated horses than the duds we'd encountered earlier. 

These guys fit the bill! It was freezing, so we pulled over and I made a few paintings from the passenger's seat.  While I was working on this one, a cop came by and peered quizzically in the window. Once he realized what I was doing, he lightened up and asked us to pull farther to the side of the "busy road." Again, coming from NYC, I couldn't help laughing - in the past fifteen minutes, we had seen no more than one truck amble by. 

Grazing horses - much livelier than the duds in the other field © Carly Larsson 2015

Grazing horses - much livelier than the duds in the other field © Carly Larsson 2015

Berkshires Weekend Pt. 1

The weekend after Thanksgiving, Grey & I drove up to the Berkshires to see our friends Ted & Betsy give a reading from their new book, How to Babysit a Leopard: and Other True Stories from Our Travels Across Six Continents at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge MA. I'd never been to the Norman Rockwell Museum, and it was a real treat. 

Norman Rockwell's studio in Stockbridge, MA. © Carly Larsson 2015 

Norman Rockwell's studio in Stockbridge, MA. © Carly Larsson 2015 

After the reading, we ventured outside to check out Rockwell's studio (above). It's closed after October, but I snuck in a quick drawing of the exterior. It was a moody, grey day with soft diffused light. The deep azure mountains were blanketed in thick sheets of fog. I could get used to a studio with that view. We set out to capture some landscapes.

Landscape in the Berkshires © Carly Larsson 2015

Landscape in the Berkshires © Carly Larsson 2015

Grey had a vision for a photograph of a dilapidated barn in the woods, so for the rest of the afternoon, we went barn hunting. Driving aimlessly down winding country roads, we'd pull over every time we found one. I was freezing, so all these drawings were made from the passenger's seat with the heat blasting. 

western massachusetts barn
collapsed barn western ma

Grey deemed the barn (above, left) too dilapidated, having collapsed completely. 

barn western mass

This barn was not dilapidated enough.

barn western ma

This barn, leaning and sagging at angles I'm sure were not intentional, was juuuust right.

Labor Day

© Carly Larsson 2015

© Carly Larsson 2015

Happy Labor Day! This summer flew by, and was a busy one for me. While I didn't get much  vacation time this year, I'm grateful to have had a few opportunities to slow down and do some drawing just for me. Here's a quick sunset painting from early August, at one of my favorite spots in Pocasset, on Cape Cod MA, where I grew up. 

The Corwith Cramer at Brooklyn Bridge Park

This past May, I spent the afternoon with my friend Audrey Hawkins drawing The Corwith Cramer in Brooklyn Bridge Park. (See Audrey's drawings from this day here). The Corwith Cramer is a 134-foot two-masted brigantine owned and operated by the Sea Education Association (SEA) out of Woods Hole, MA, just a few towns over from where I grew up on Cape Cod. 

carlylarsson_corwithcramer_brooklyn
Photograph © Etienne Frossard 2015

Photograph © Etienne Frossard 2015

The ship serves as a floating lab, classroom, and office for students and researchers. This particular crew was returning from a five-week voyage studying biodiversity and conservation of the Sargasso Sea region. The ship's arrival in Brooklyn marked the end of the voyage, which began April 20 in San Juan Puerto Rico. 

While we were drawing, Etienne Frossard, photographer for the Brooklyn Bridge Park, snapped our photo.

Mystic Winter

With a snowstorm to ring in the first day of spring this year, I was certain winter would never end. As sick as I have become of layers, hunching into my jacket and doing the penguin waddle over treacherous sidewalks, the harsh cold was not without its beauty. Here are a few little watercolors I made on a trip to Mystic Seaport with Dalvero Academy this past February. We will be back this weekend, and here's hoping the snow and ice have thawed!

© Carly Larsson 2015

© Carly Larsson 2015

© Carly Larsson 2015

© Carly Larsson 2015

Bethesda Fountain

Well, my daily blogging has officially become a thing of the past. Due to this hectic thing called life, I'm afraid I must slow the posts to a minimum of one per week. Monday I visited Central Park with my friend Audrey to draw at the Bethesda Fountain. There is so much going on in the park. While we drew, there was an opera singer performing behind us, and at least three pairs of models/photographers doing their thing. When I first arrived, there was a guy in a spiffy suit and nifty red socks playing the saxophone, but the opera performance behind us was apparently too much competition for him and, regrettably, he left before I had the chance to draw him. 

The Bethesda Fountain in Central Park NYC © Carly Larsson 2014

The Bethesda Fountain in Central Park NYC © Carly Larsson 2014

The fountain sculpture was designed by Emma Stebbins in 1868. Stebbins was the first woman to receive a commission for a major public work of art in NYC. Pretty cool! The sculpture is also known as "Angel of the Waters" and refers to the Gospel of John where an angel blesses the pool of Bethesda, giving it healing powers. The four cherubs below the angel are supposed to represent temperance, purity, health and peace. I can get behind three of those symbols (hint: none of them are temperance). 

The Charles W. Morgan in Boston

As I've mentioned, I spent the summer with Dalvero Academy doing a reportage project on the Charles W. Morgan, the world's last wooden whaling ship. I really need to go through all my drawings so I can do a more in-depth blog post about the events, but for now here's a quick one of the Morgan docked at the Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston this past July.

The Charles W. Morgan docked in Boston MA at the Charlestown Navy Yard, July 2014 © Carly Larsson

The Charles W. Morgan docked in Boston MA at the Charlestown Navy Yard, July 2014 © Carly Larsson

My friend Despina just shared her gorgeous drawings of the Morgan's return to Mystic Seaport, CT. Can't wait to share mine from that day - coming soon!   

Inside the Prison Ship Martyr's Monument

The Prison Ship Martyr's Monument is a memorial to the 11,500 American soldiers who died in captivity aboard 16 British prison ships in Wallabout Bay during the American Revolutionary War.  The history of the monument is really quite complex, but I'll try to sum it up. Remains of some of the soldiers who died aboard the ships were initially interred near the Brooklyn Navy Yard (Vinegar Hill) in 1808, but moved and re-interred in 1873 beneath a small monument in what is now Fort Greene Park. Funds were then raised for a larger monument designed by Stanford White. The monument is a granite Doric column 149 ft high, and at the top of the column sits an eight-ton bronze brazier (funeral urn) by the sculptor Adolf Weinman. 

Inside the Prison Ship Martyr's Monument, looking up © Carly Larsson 2014

Inside the Prison Ship Martyr's Monument, looking up © Carly Larsson 2014

The monument is rarely opened, but last Sunday it was open to the public and I had the opportunity to go inside for a few minutes and do a quick drawing (I got there just as they were closing it up). Apparently there used to be a spiral staircase leading to the top of the monument and visitors could pay to climb up and see the views of Manhattan, but now there's just a rusty ladder that looks like it might crumble if touched lightly. On the concrete floor there is a copper door leading to the crypt below (the crypt was not open).  Unfortunately I was rushed out before I had a chance to draw it. 

View of the monument from outside © Carly Larsson 2014

View of the monument from outside © Carly Larsson 2014

Fort Greene Park actually used to be Fort Putnam under the supervision of General Nathanael Greene during the Revolutionary War (1776) because it is one of the highest points in Brooklyn. It housed six eighteen-pound cannons and was the largest fort on Long Island. The fort was later renamed after Greene.

Brooklyn Botanic Garden

Late post today - deadline tomorrow! Here's a painting I did a couple Sundays ago at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden.